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How to wear a Sari ?



How to Drape Sari

Gujrati / North Indian Style : This style of sari draping is very similar to the Nivi style with the only difference being that in this style, the "Pallu" or the decorative end of the sari is draped over the right shoulder rather than the left shoulder. Also, in this style the pallu is draped from back to front and not like the Nivi in which the pallu is draped front to back.

Maharashtrian Style :This style of sari draping is very similar to the way the Maharashtrian dhoti is worn. This style of sari draping is common among the Brahmin women especially in Maharashtra, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. This sari is draped in a way that the center of the sari is neatly placed at the back of the waist and the ends of the sari are tied securely in the front, and then the two ends are wrapped around the legs. The decorative ends are then draped over the shoulder and the upper body or torso.

Dravidian Style : This sari draping style is common in the state of Tamil Nadu. The archetypical Dravidian sari is the "veshti-mundanai", which is draped in two parts: The veshti covers the lower body, while the mundanai, or mundu, is an add-on to the veshti. The draping of the veshti is fairly simple as it draped like a towel around the waist and is usually 4 yards in length. This is then folded in half lengthwise. The mundunai is usually one yard in width and two yards in length. Some of these saris are distinctly characterized by a pleated rosette also called pinkosu at the waist.

Madisaara Style : This sari draping style is common among the Brahmin ladies of Tamil Nadu and Kerala. This style of sari is worn on festive occasions or ceremonies and since the style of draping this sari is different as compared to other styles; nine-yard sari is required to wear this style. The Madisar sari is draped in the following way: The sari is neatly wrapped around the waist, with the one end of sari on the right side, while the rest of the saree on the left. A knot is tied at the left waist firmly. The rest of the sari is gathered near the waist. Then a bit of the sari is neatly tucked into the right side of the waist. The end of the sari is then pleated into folds and tucked into the waist. The rest of the saris then folded into 4 to 5 fold, with each fold measuring approximately three fourth of the hand. The pleated sari is then brought at the back with the folded saree between the legs. After neatly gathering the folds, they neatly tucked at the back side of waist. The sari is then gathered to the right side in front and draped over the left shoulder. The end or pallu of the sari is then gathered around the waist and neatly tucked into the left side of the waist.



Kodagu Style : This sari draping style is typical to ladies from the Kodagu district of Karnataka. This sari draping differs from other styles because in this the folded pleats of the sari are formed at the back instead of the usual front side. The pallu or decorative end of the sari is carefully draped from the back to front over the right shoulder. This is secured by a pin to the sari to keep it in place.

Gond Style : This sari draping style is common in central parts of India. In this style, before arranging to drape the sari over the body, the sari is first draped over the left shoulder.



Mundum Neryathum Style : This sari draping style is common in the state of Kerala. This is essentially two-piece sari attire, in which the mundu forms the lower garment while the neriyathu forms the upper garment. This sari can be draped either in the customary style in which the neriyathu is tucked inside the blouse or the more modern style in which the neriyathu comes over the left shoulder.



Tribal Styles : The tribal styles are usually draped to cover the chest by tying and securing the sari firmly across the chest.