Meir Ezra: Why You May Hate to Study

No doubt about it. To be successful, you need to read and apply instructions. You must know how to study written material and then use it on your job or in life.

 

Yet if you get a headache or feel bored or frustrated while studying, you will look for excuses to quit.

 

One reason people get those feelings and fail to learn certain subjects is they try to study the subjects without seeing the actual objects in front of them.

 

"You're trying to teach this fellow all about tractors and you're not giving him any tractors. Well, he's going to wind up with a face that feels squashed, with headaches and with his stomach feeling funny. He's going to feel dizzy from time to time and very often his eyes are going to hurt." -- L. Ron Hubbard

 

Which would you prefer? A three-hour lecture on how to train dogs or a dog-training workshop where you bring your own dog and try out what you learn? Which method would work best for you?

 

Unfortunately, most education does not offer the "mass" or physical objects to show you how things actually work. For example, you listen to a lecture about managing employees with no stories or demonstrations. You read about cutting hair from a book that has no pictures of people's hair. You learn how to set up a website with no computer.

 

Without the objects of the subject, you eventually feel dizzy or get a headache. Your eyes might hurt. You might feel bored or exasperated, like you are frustrated, angry or annoyed.

 

If you think about it, the most difficult subjects involve the least amount of mass or physical objects. Most people do not enjoy studying laws, computer language or accounting because very few objects are involved.

 

Yet you can enjoy studying any subject if you can see or create a demonstration to envision how

something works.