burl3rat

namefrance6

This is another option Advice so you can get your Arduino

(as well as other PIC)

connected with your network (ethernet) - utilize an past NSLU2!

The NSLU2 and Arduino both talk TTL, but the NSLU2 is 3.3v and Arduino is 5v. Basic correct - give a resistor!

Only 3 wiring are essential - pins 4, 3 and 2 upon the NSLU2. You do not desire to relate

the flexibility pin.

For each the table under, shop for the light stripe - this is the drive pin.

NSLU2 - pin-out of the J2 serial port

Pin 1 - 3.3v, pin 1 includes whitened stripe right next to it

Pin 2 - RXD, end up with from Arduino

to NSLU2 (recommended resistor)

Pin 3 - TXD, transmit from NSLU2 to Arduino

Pin 4 - GND, ground network

This information is designed in guide around the "Freeduino" - a BBB (uncovered bone table) variation. Be certain everything

is powered away from and unplugged. Then, relate the TTL pins labeled "RX", "TX" and "GND" located on the Better business bureau to

the proper pins on the NSLU2. The Four serial harbour TTL pins in the NSLU2 are

observable just beneath the battery off to the right.

You will need to set a 10k resistor between your

Arduino and NSLU2 on pin 2 this NSLU2 so

the

5v from the Arduino are lowered to suitable amounts.

Now strength in the NSLU2 and Arduino which is flased with Debian (SlugOS will need to tasks also). Fit minicom (apt-get) and

initiate up minicom and set the serial dock tottyS0 and 9600, 8N1.

If the connections are correct, the TTL pins/port on the Arduino and NSLU2 are functional you should now see the output

from the Arduino. Be sure you have pre-programmed your Arduino with a program that outputs text

at the proper baud rate if you do not see anything. Also consider driving off of both instruments, power back

up and attempt over again. If you have made

other hardware mods such as overclocking on the NSLU2, it is possible the serial port will not work.

You will need to space a 10k resistor amongst the

Arduino and therefore the NSLU2 on pin 2 of the NSLU2 hence the

5v from the Arduino are dropped to comfortable values.

Now vigor along

the Arduino and NSLU2 thats

generally flased with Debian (SlugOS might effort also). Set

up minicom (apt-get) and get started up minicom and set the serial port to9600 and

ttyS0, 8N1.

If the connections are correct, the TTL pins/port on the Arduino and NSLU2 are functional you should now see the output

from the Arduino. Be sure you have pre-programmed your Arduino with a program that outputs text

at the proper baud rate if you do not see anything. Also make an effort powering off of at the same time products, performance back

up and attempt over again. If you have made

other hardware mods such as overclocking on the NSLU2, it is possible the serial port will not work.