The major application for TiO is as a pigment in

Fig. 2. Adsorption isotherms of ISA (■), PHS 1400 (?), and PHS 3500 (♦) on uncoated TiO2 in decalin. Solid lines were obtained from Langmuir fit (inset).Figure optionsDownload full-size imageDownload as PowerPoint slide
Fig. 3. Adsorption isotherms of ISA (■), PHS 1400 (?), and PHS 3500 (♦) on uncoated TiO2 in mesitylene. Solid lines were obtained from Langmuir fit (inset).Figure optionsDownload full-size imageDownload as PowerPoint slide
The adsorption curves were applied to the Langmuir equation [16] i.e.:equation(1)CeQe=1QmK+CeQmwhere Qe A 887826 the equilibrium adsorbate concentration on adsorbent (mg m−2), Qm is ventral monolayer capacity of the adsorbent (mg m−2), K is adsorption constant (L mg−1), and Ce is equilibrium adsorbate concentration in solution (mg L−1).
The straight line relationship between Ce/Qe versus Ce for all the dispersants enabled values for the Langmuir adsorption equilibrium constant (K) and for the monolayer capacity of the adsorbent (Qm) to be obtained from the intercept (1/QmK) and from the slope (1/Qm). As seen in the insets in Fig. 2 and Fig. 3, the Langmuir isotherm fits quite well with the experimental data for all dispersants in both solvents (R2 > 0.99).