Blog Post: Only 44 percent of American Consumers Trust Companies' Green Claims

So you think its the right marketing or philosophical choice to be a green cleaning company, but how do you know that the green products you use are

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-Effective at actually cleaningremoving contaminants?

-Proven disinfectantskilling and/or removing 99.9% of specific bacteria and germs (keep in mind that the EPA will not register a disinfectant calling itself green)

-Safe for cleaning technicians to use, homeowners to breath, pets and children to be near, and for the environment when washed down the drain or off-gassed into the air

-Green in any wayreducing waste and pollution through the entire manufacturing and delivery process, using less water to effectively clean and disinfect (that when using traditional products)

There are a LOT of questions you need to answer for yourself and to be prepared to answer and provide proof for to consumers. A recent survey indicates that saying youre green might get you in more trouble than simply being green and good.

ISSA News March 28, 2012 Only 44 percent of American consumers trust companies green claims, according to a recent Cone Communications survey.

Eight in 10 Americans surveyed dont believe companies are addressing all of their environmental impacts, reportsThe Environmental Leader. The report also found that 43 percent of consumers actively seek out environmental information on the products they buy, and 77 percent would boycott a product if misled about its green claims.

Consumers Dont Trust Green Product Claims, Survey Says

Eight in ten Americans dont believe companies are addressing all of their environmental impacts, and only 44 percent trust companies green claims, according to research by Cone Communications.

This skepticism may affect sales. In fact, as many as 77 percent would be willing to boycott if misled, according to the2011 Cone Green Gap Trend Tracker.

Some 43 percent of consumers actively seek out environmental information on the products they buy, according to the survey. When purchasing an environmental product, 81 percent are likely to be swayed by an ecolabel such as Energy Star or WaterSense. And 80 percent would choose a product if its packaging featured specific data detailing, for instance, how much plastic was saved over an earlier version.

Environmental imagery on packaging, such as a mountain ranges or trees, would sway 44 percent of consumers, the survey says.

In general, green consumers are getting more savvy about products environmental claims. In this years survey just 36 percent of consumers thought that products labeled environmentally friendly have a positive impact on the environment rather than just being less damaging than non-green products. This figure isdown from 41 percent in 2011and 48 percent in 2010.

Some 42 percent of Americans have been discouraged from buying a green product because they believed it cost more than the traditional product, and a third believed the environmentally preferred product would not be of equal quality, the survey says.

(Note: The views expressed in this blog post are those of the author, and do not necessarily represent those of The Housekeeping Channel, LLC.)

Only 44 percent of American Consumers Trust Companies' Green Claims: Created on May 5th, 2015. Last Modified on May 5th, 2015