About Mohair

The term mohair is sometimes used to describe a type of material used for the folding roof on convertible cars. In this instance, mohair refers to a form of denim-like canvas. Mohair should not be confused with the fur from the angora rabbit, which is called angora wool.

During World War II, U.S. soldiers wore uniforms made of wool. Worried that domestic producers could not supply enough for future wars, Congress enacted loan and price support programs for wool and mohair in the National Wool Act of 1954 as part of the 1954 Farm Bill.

Nevertheless, the U.S. government continued to provide subsidies to mohair producers until 1995, when the subsidies were eliminated effective with the marketing year ending December 31, 1995.

Fibers from young goats are softest and are used to manucture yarn for clothing. Fibers from mature goats are used to produce such things as rugs and carpets.

and is often used in fiber blends to add these qualities to a textile. Mohair takes dye exceptionally well. Mohair is warm in winter as it has great insulating properties, while remaining cool in summer due to its moisture wicking properties. It is durable, naturally elastic, flame resistant, crease resistant, and does not felt. It is considered to be a luxury fiber, like cashmere, angora and silk, and is usually more expensive than most wool that comes from sheep.

Mohair is also used in climbing skins for randonnee skiing. The mohair is used in a carpet allowing the skier an appropriate ascension method without sliding downhill.

Mohair is composed mostly of keratin, a protein found in the hair, wool, horns and skin of all mammals. While it has scales like wool, the scales are not fully developed, merely indicated.

Mohair is not a soft yarn, when compared with alpaca or cashmere, or synthetic fibers or wools that have been treated and blended with other fibers to enhance softness. On the other hand, mohair is valued for certain unique characteristics: it is warmer than other fibers, even when used to make a light-weight garment, and is often blended with wool for this reason; and mohair fibers have a distinctive luster created by the way they reflect light. Combined with mohairs ability to absorb dyes exceptionally well, pure mohair yarns are usually recognizable for their vivid saturated colours.

It increases in diameter with the age of the goat, growing along with the animal. Fine hair from younger animals is used for finer applications such as clothing, and the thicker hair from older animals is more often used for carpets and heavy brics intended for outerwear.

As of 2002, mohair producers were still able to receive special assistance loans from the U.S. government, after an amendment to eliminate the subsidy was defeated.

Wikipedia articles incorporating a citation from the New International Encyclopedia with an unnamed parameter

In about 1820, raw mohair was first exported from Turkey to England, which then became the leading manucturer of mohair products. The Yorkshire mills spun yarn that was exported to Russia, Germany, Austria, etc., as well as woven directly in Yorkshire.