More-On: The Lion Dentist | Bernie Shine

I may have misspelled a couple of words in that headline, but the pronunciation is correct.

When dentist Walter James Palmer allegedly slaughtered the beloved lion named Cecil in Zimbabwe, he issued a statement in which he said he "took" the lion.

"I had no idea that the lion I took was a known, local favorite, was collared and part of a study until the end of the hunt. I relied on the expertise of my local professional guides to ensure a legal hunt," claimed Palmer.

This serial animal killer says he "took" the lion. Really? Took? As Jimmy Kimmel aptly pointed out, "... you take an aspirin; you killed the lion."

I suppose, in a sense Palmer did take the lion. Cecil was taken from his pride and cubs, from a protected reserve, from the researchers at Oxford University who were tracking and studying him, from the Nation of Zimbabwe, from all of the tourists who loved watch and photograph the proud and passive feline, and from all of us.

But where did he take him? It appears he didn't "take" him anywhere, but instead he "left" him. Cecil's dead rotting carcass was found exactly where it was left.



By the way, someone also "took" the dead animal that was utilized to bait Cecil out of his protected reserve. That's TWO animals that were "taken." One animal was "taken" to lure and kill a second animal. It's a two-for-one day of fun in the sun!

Palmer also claimed "I have not been contacted by authorities in Zimbabwe or in the U.S. about this situation, but will assist them in any inquiries they may have."

Dentist http://hoytsghe.buzznet.com/photos/default/?id=68755182 Palmer is now being sought by Zimbabwe and U.S. authorities, but they can't find him. That doesn't sound like someone who is trying to "assist" anyone. He continues to be in hiding, but should be easy to find. Just look for the guy in the chicken costume with fire coming out of his pants.

Click here to visit the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at Oxford.

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