Family, friends remember Gabrielle Campo

Sari Lesk, Gannett Central Wisconsin Media 9:58 p.m. CDT August 29, 2015

The Gabrielle Campo memorial service was held on Third Street in Wausau at the site "Gabby's Garden" which is named in memory of Gabby, Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015. The garden is part of MOSAIC (Mending One's Self and Inspiring Change) which is a program through The Neighbors Place.(Photo: Megan McCormick/Stevens Point Journal Media)Buy Photo

WAUSAU Family and friends gathered Saturday evening to remember Gabrielle Campo, who lost her life to an addiction.

Campo died July 20 from a heroin overdose. Police found her dead in a house on Wausaus southeast side.

Campos loved ones gathered for a memorial service Saturday at Gabbys Garden in Wausau. The garden is part of a program launched by The Neighbors Place this year, called Mending Ones Self and Inspiring Change.

The garden is being named after Campo.

The memorial came together through community donations, including the food, tent and sound system, said Campos father Jeff.

We couldnt be more blessed, he said.

The service was led by Bob MacRae, a professor at the Moody Bible Institute where Campos brother Jordan studies.

Its not that Gabby didnt care, he said.

MacRae said Campo is now free from her addiction.



She knows what its like to be free of that addiction, he said. She knows what its like to be free of that life that was hard and was pulling her down.

The memorial was attended by about 80 people who were friends of Campo and her family.

Fawn Mueller of Wausau is a friend of Campos father who attended the ceremony. She said her sister struggles with addiction and that attending the memorial helped her reflect on the situation her sister is dealing with.

Campos family posted an account of her life called Gabbys Story on the Brainard Funeral Homes website following her death. The story is written from her perspective and talks of her struggles with addiction and abuse.

Pam MacRae, wife of Bob MacRae, read the story during the memorial.

For people like me, the system is broken, the story reads. They treated me like a criminal, locking me up for days and months at a time. I just needed someone who understood me and wanted to help me, not just lock me away and forget about me.

Sari Lesk can be reached at 715-345-2257 and slesk@gannett.com. Follow her on Twitter as @Sari_Lesk.

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