How to Detect Counterfeit Medicines While Traveling

How to Detect Counterfeit Medicines While Traveling

Counterfeiting is a global phenomenon contributing to illness, death, toxicity and drug resistance. Up until now, the authorities are not able to trace how drugs are being smuggled between countries. With the strict regulation in every entry way either by the airport or sea ports and land boundaries, it is highly unlikely that these fraudsters can pass security. Yet, despite it, there is still an abundant trade between countries. 

 

Experts are convinced that counterfeiting has been manufactured and widespread in developing countries. Since it is known that in these regions the security is lacking, there are enough basis for review to reach this conclusion. 

 

According to an international study conducted by The Peterson Group, a non-profit organization campaigning against the proliferation of substandard, fraud and illegal drugs, counterfeiting occurs throughout the world, but it is most common in countries where there are few or no rules about making drugs. An estimated 10%–30% of medicines sold in developing countries are counterfeit. In the industrialized world (countries such as the United States, Australia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, and those in the European Union), estimates suggest that less than 1% of medicines sold are counterfeit.

 

True enough, the markets in the streets of Jakarta, which also consist of black and gray markets, are flourishing with locally manufactured and smuggled counterfeit medicines ranging from Tamiflu, Viagra and anti-malarial drugs. Not only does this happen in Indonesia. Countries such as Thailand, Cambodia and Malaysia also have their own records and statistics.