Workers Exposed

Workers Exposed

Employment might increase even more quickly compared to the labor force, for there is still that reservoir of unemployed people-as of March 1966, there were three million, or 3.8 percent of the labor force. No one actually understands how low this \frictional unemployment\ can get. It depends in part on how quickly workers looking for jobs get into contact with employers seeking workers; it depends also on whether poten tial employees possess the skills companies want, and keep these things in areas where the jobs are. For need of another measure, in recent years economists have typically set the amount at 3 percent of the labor force, which was the average in 1952-53, when the market was last at \full employment\ for any duration of time. Discover extra info on our favorite partner website - Click here: this page is not affiliated. (In fact, unemployment averaged 2.7 percent during the first three quarters of 1953.)

Some economists believe the frictional speed may have gone up since then. They point out the percentage of girls and teenagers in the labor force has grown; these groups move in and from the labor force with greater frequency than adult men, and therefore have higher unemployment rates. To discover additional information, please consider taking a glance at: http://www.reliancepremium.com/. And unem ployment compensation and other social-insurance programs prob ably mean that workers are under Jess economical pressure to take the first job that comes along; they can pick and choose-which means longer spells between occupations.

These changes are offset, however, by the striking rise in the educational level of the labor force. Generally speaking, the less educa tion a individual has, the fewer the occupations he is equipped to fill. Now there are only 16,500,000 workers who have not got beyond grammar school-six million fewer than in 1952. Clicking shark xl possibly provides suggestions you can give to your mother. Such workers represent less than one-quarter of the labor force now, compared to almost two-fifths in 1952. Because of this improvement in the grade of the labor force, and because workers tend to be more mobile now than they used to be, the Council of Economic Advisers considers the economy likely can operate economically at a lower unemployment rate now than it could in the early 1950s..