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Best answer:

In most instances, you would forfeit your deposit as well as required to pay the rent for an additional 3 months or when your former landlord is able to rent the unit again which ever happens first.

A landlord is not able to charge you for the entirety of the lease.

Based on your lease you are required to give...

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Best answer: In most instances, you would forfeit your deposit as http://www.golfdigest.com well as required to pay the rent for an additional 3 months or when your former landlord is able to rent the unit again which ever happens first.



A landlord is not able to charge you for the entirety of the lease.

Based on your lease you are required to give the landlord notice in writing that you would be breaking the lease.

In some instances if you find a qualified replacement you would not be charged anything and you might not lose your deposit. This is not an adversary position between you and the landlord. Things happen that might prevent us from doing certain things.

Talk to your landlord, be of as much assistance as you are able to. Think of this, the landlord was expecting you to be in the rental unit for a certain period of time. Due to unforeseen events you are not able to uphold your end of the deal.

Talk to your friends, see if they are in need of a place to rent. This does http://www.floridagolf.com/ not have to be your full time action, however, it would show you are concerned about not being able to live up to your end of the bargain.

I hope this has been of some benefit to you, good luck.

"FIGHT ON"