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The Origin of Sodium Sulphate Anhydrous 97%


         Sodium Sulphate was discovered by Johann R Glauber, a German/Dutch chemist in 1625. . Unlike other compounds, Sodium Sulphate was not found as an independent compound, but was prepared from salt (sodium chloride) and sulfuric acid, from Austrian spring water. Sodium Sulphate was named sal mirabilis, which means miraculous salt, by Glauber. It was named so because of its medicinal properties. Though Glauber named it sal mirabilis, it became famous as Glauber's salt only.
 
        Anhydrous sodium sulfate 97% is in the form of hygroscopic white powder, and has no odor. Its formula is Na2SO4. Sodium Sulphate Anhydrous 97% is soluble in water, but insoluble in ethanol. Its boiling point is 1100ºC, and melting point is 880 - 888ºC.This compound is stable under ordinary conditions, but at a high temperature, it is reduced to sodium sulfide. 

       Sodium Sulphate Anhydrous 97% is mainly used in laundry detergents. Another major use in USA is for manufacturing wood pulp, in the Kraft process. Sodium Sulphate Anhydrous 97% is also used for manufacturing textiles. As it reduces negative charges on fibers, it helps the dyes penetrate evenly, and thus aids in 'leveling'.In addition, Anhydrous sodium sulfate 97% is used in the glass industry, not for producing glass, but for removing air bubbles from molten glass. It also prevents scum formation, as it fluxes the glass.We might find anhydrous sodium sulphate in passive solar heating systems also, as it has been proposed for storing heat. Though Sodium Sulphate Anhydrous 97%is not regarded as being toxic, it is better to handle it with care.

          If you want to know more about Sodium Sulphate Anhydrous 97%, please get to know YuanJia Sodium Sulphate Co.Ltd in our websit.

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