Rosmini And The Institute Of Charity

Rosmini And The Institute Of Charity

 

Antonio Francesco Davide Ambrogio Rosmini, is considered to be one of the greatest Catholic theologians to ever have existed. He dedicated his life to the contemplation of the doctrines of the Catholic Church incorporating and constituting both its counterparts the Eastern Catholic churches and also the Latin Church into his academic discourse. His greatest contribution to the Catholic theology was probably The Institute of Charity, which is unofficially referred to as the Rosminians. He believed ardently in the theory of the “Principle of Passivity” (of which he was also the founder) which sought to answer the paradoxical question of the fact that whether our actions arise from our own individualistic and intrinsically personal wish to do something constructive for the entire human race or whether from an impulse to perform what is God’s desire. Click here for more info.

 

What was Rosmini’s role in the creation of the Institute of Charity?

 

When he founded the Institute of Charity in 1828 in the relatively unknown province of Monte Calvario in Domodossola, other such foundations by the Rosminians urgently sprung up in England and also in Italy which only testifies to its dedication of purpose and sincerity of spirit. The founder himself ensured that the choice of members who were allowed into the institution wasn’t exclusive but included people from all varieties of profession, ranging from priests to laymen who were univocally encouraged to immerse themselves in material and spiritual works of charity. However, during the movement that led to the freedom and unification of Italy, social and judicial reforms were difficult to enact yet Rosmini struggled against all odds to retain the dominating influence of the Church.