The latest Hazard Communication Standards

The latest Hazard Communication Standards

Safety programs all over the United States are presently under revision to include the United Nation’s GHS of Classifications. Chemical labeling of Hazardous Materials are changing to promote a unique approach to give staffs a better understanding of what they are actually working with, which gives a much required update to the previous 1910:1200 standard.

The GHS standards for OSHA GHS training originated over years of negotiations by Hazard Communication adepts in various countries. The final product of the international effort is the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of chemicals.  The United Nations has also committed to revise and revisit these standards every two years as required to further refine the safety programs. Still now, the revisions have been further clarifications of the presentation of the information.

Previously, different manufacturers and distributors would slightly vary how a chemical was labeled, and how Safety Plans would vary and have to leave room for this variance. For example, the same chemicals may be labeled toxic, very toxic or extremely toxic depending on the company the chemical originated from. The newly adopted system eradicates the variance and propels uniformity. Every hazard can be classified in any of the 9 pictograms within a red framed border during the RCRA training process.

 Updates to the standard Hazard Communication Training also need Material Safety data Sheets to abide by a specific 16 section standard. The Safety Data Sheets are not changing, but the presentation and format of the information is changing. The information will be necessary to be in order, permitting professionals using the information to be able to quickly refer to the required sections effectively. The necessity for the Threshold Limit Values set by the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienist will continue to be listed, but the limit is voluntary.